Busta Rhymes revived a little bit of the 90’s last week with the release of “Get It,” featuring the likewise fast vocal stylings of Missy Elliott and additional backing help from Kelly Rowland. He would have to shit the bed in the most extreme possible way to make this sound like anything short of legendary.

Thankfully, neither Busta nor his collaborators catastrophically shit the bed, and “Get It” turned out to be an instant win that I can’t wait to hear dropped into sets in the coming festival season. It’s been a refreshing trend to see some of the big names from the 90’s and early 00’s emerging back into the fold.

As good as the song is, as immediate the flows, and as addictive as the ridiculously dominant 808 is, the song is not without its imperfections. Case in point: The absolutely WTF breakdown at the 2:35 mark. I’m going to call it a cacophony, but most people would (and should) agree that, at the very least, it rapidly shifts into a hot mess.

I’m not sure what to call this, or what the intention behind the abrupt shift is about. Is it supposed to be a dirty drop? Did they employ the use of random number generators or use dice to determine the course of the song, and everything was serendipitous up until that moment? Everything in the song changes and it’s such a train wreck that I have a really hard time believing that it was mastered at the same time as the rest of the song, if at all. It’s an unnerving fifteen seconds, then the song drops back into its previous format for a quick outro. It’s like a poem that switches to Ikea instructions for a few lines before it ends. I just don’t know what to do with it, or why it is there.

Hopefully we’re in for more work from Busta Rhymes. In the age of mumble rap, it’s refreshing to hear powerful enunciation from somebody eager to blast their message loud and clear. In the meantime, you can buy/stream “Get It” HERE via The Conglomerate Entertainment/Epic Records.

 

I work, live and play in Minneapolis.

I try to tell the story of the people that create music and experiences through pictures as well as through words.